Lost and found – confessions from a blogger

I couple of weeks ago I wrote an essay about automation, and that it made me loose touch with Twitter. The feedback’s been good on that piece, and it got me thinking further about how I communicate and what type of content I put out these days.

When I started creating content, now over 12 years ago, it was very personal. I loved that. And I’m realising now that I never felt more close to my audience as I did then. I’m still personal some places online, mostly my letters, but my blog especially have become gradually less personal. I’ve skipped the contex of why I’m sharing what I’m doing, and my feelings around it – and just jumped into lists and short bursts of thoughts. It was easier, and it got more views.

But it also made me loose the tight connection I had with my audience. Something I’m just realising, and that honestly makes me sad. For me having a close relationship to my audience is the most important thing. I would rather have 10 close readers, then 1000 random ones.

The last 14 days I’ve created a video daily from my life, a vlog of some sorts. I forced myself to become personal again. It’s been loads of fun, and also sparks my creativity in ways I have not felt in many years. It’s really exiting!

So it’s time to get my blog back to what it meant for me and my audience back in the days. I’m going to try to create more personal content again. Not relationship advice or what I’m eating for breakfast, not that personal. But more of the stuff that’s in my head at any given time. Not just stuff designed to further my personal brand, but stuff I think you as the reader would appreciate.

More REAL content, less click baits and quick fixes. Great content needs to be spent time on, and it needs to mean something for me – and for you.

Like this great piece from a girl called Nicole Eddy about her recent trip to Zambia. Talk about putting your heart and soul into every word. Very inspiring to read!

So yeah, let’s see where this goes?!

 

Automation ruined my relationship with Twitter

I fell in love with Twitter back when everything happened via SMS/texts. I’ve never felt more connected with the world. It was love at first tweet.

I was one of the first few hundred of Norwegians who had an account back in 2007. I was hooked. The conversations, the attitude between all users – the willingness to help each other.
We were defining how we wanted this community to grow and develop.

I used it daily, hourly even. I met people via Twitter everywhere I went in the world. I got new friends, I met new clients. It was great.

Today. I’ve completely lost my Twitter game. I no longer feel anything when I log in and see tweets. It’s just a mess, and building relationships on the service is getting harder and harder. For me, anyway.

I’ve been thinking a lot about this lately. I think that services like Buffer and other automation services where you don’t need to be in front of a screen to post something, has ruined Twitter for me. I’ve automated myself out of my own game.

The people following me was really interested in the content I shared. And by the simplicity to just add articles in a queue it got too easy. I started focusing on just sharing, not the conversations I really loved (idiot).

My followers count kept on growing, but I stopped logging in daily. I stopped loving Twitter. I even blogged about that twitter is dying (I still believe that) within the next two years.

But, I will still give Twitter another chance. With me visiting New York this week and seeing how you still can connect with interesting people via Twitter – I won’t give it up. I will just try to get back to me building relationships via Twitter, instead of just sharing stuff.

So no more robots, more humans.

 

StoryYELLING — yeah, not a typo

A story is only interesting if people pays attention to it. If you loose their focus your story will be broken.

That doesn’t mean that you have to yell your story to your audience.

The best storytellers I know almost whispers the most important parts. If the story is good, and the timing is right. People will listen no matter what.

It’s the same with marketing. The channels is not that important. It’s your story, the context and the timing that matters.

Don’t be a storyYELLER, be a storyteller.

Focus on telling the best stories to your audience, and stop spending to much time, money and energy on channels and technology.

 
 
 
 

Going With the Flow With Your Audience

I’ve tried rafting a couple of times. You jump into a raft with some strangers and go screaming down the river (loads of fun, BTW). You start at the top and your goal is to arrive somewhere down the river. How you actually get to that point is nearly impossible to plan in advance. There are so many waves, rocks and obstacles that you have to go with the flow and your instincts in order to reach your destination. Continue reading “Going With the Flow With Your Audience”